Animation Company

which were accustomed to scare people and convinced them that animation company are seeing some kind of supernatural being.

Thaumatrope (1824)

Even though it may seem like some type of medical device, a thaumatrope is really a toy that acquired recognition within the 1800s.

A disk having a picture on every side is mounted on two bits of string. Once the strings are twirled rapidly between your fingers the 2 images seem to blend into one, because of a great factor known as persistence of vision (where multiple images blend right into a single image inside your brain, which produces the illusion of movement). You’ve probably seen one before, but simply unfamiliar the reputation for it!

Phenakistoscope (1831)

Another device that utilizes persistence of vision, the phenakistoscope includes a spinning disk attached up and down to some handle. A number of sketches showing the various phases from the animation are put together round the center from the disc, much like a number of equally spread radial slits.

Whomever desired to see the animation company would spin the disc, then apply with the moving slits in the dvds reflection inside a mirror. The end result? An immediate succession of images that appear to be just like a single moving picture.

The phenakistoscope wasn’t popular for very lengthy, though, because of the emergence of some other bit of technology…

Zoetrope (1834)

The zoetrope works on a single principle because the phenakistoscope, but is rather a round spinning device, in which the user would examine vertical slits round the sides from the device to see the moving images.

Unlike the phenakistoscope, the zoetrope didn’t require using a mirror to see the illusion, and is seen by a number of people at the same time because of its round shape.
Switch book (1868)

You’ve certainly seen or made one of these simple before. First patented like a ‘kineograph’, a switch book is really a small book with every page getting one out of a number of animation images situated near its unbound edge.

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